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Scout's Potential Canine Support Group Meeting Hall
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Yapette
Tangentistan
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January 1, 2011 - 5:28 pm
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So, as I was saying (on the front page! where I have derailed a serious front page article! due to having broken PMs! Not totally as I can PM someone who has PMed me, but not PM someone whose name isn't on my Buddy List)......

Yes, adoptions from private groups can be pricey. They may foster an animal for months. They certainly don't make a profit & have expensive vet bills (healing/fixing the sick, neutering, shots). How do I know?

Daughter heavily involved & fostered.

Our dogs adopted from:

1) private group that hosts weekend "showings" at local pet store. A good source for above average animals *but* the good ones go fast! Potential adopters arrive before time & dibbs what they're seeking as soon as the animals are unloaded from foster family vehicles.

2) private foster care - expensive but in long run, I much prefer. The animal is known, the family can describe the dog's preferences & behaviors both positive & negative, better chance for a good fit between you & dog.

3) municipal shelter - a barking hell-hole of concrete & urine smells. We'd printed out a dozen dog profiles from the web & not one was there. Our rescue was in a room of "not availables" for numerous reasons (quarrantine for rabies watch, un-neutered, sick, etc). We got her due to a volunteer who broke the rules, matched us up cause she wanted this sweet dog out of that hell-hole asap. History unknown, kennel cough that infected our other two, un-neutered (neutering included in $60 adoption fee). All slots booked so we were to return in 10 days for what we learned later was a mass-production line neutering of 10sand10s done by minimally trained. As she was skin & bones + sick, she probably would not have survived the operation. We opted to cure her first, then have our vet do the operation (first quote: $500 - I croaked!)

To recap: you kinda get what you pay for. Cheap rescues can be sick, unknown history, pic you see online may be gone/adopted/killed. Or  you can luck out with a wonderful animal at a bargain. Volunteer groups place (primarily) healthy, well-adjusted (they do initial behavior training if needed), known animals but charge $100s.

I think you have made an excellent decision to get a pet. Don't give up looking - it may take some time. We found #1 (deceased) at our first pet store roundup. #2 took months of petstore drop-ins. I studied #3's picture online for 6 weeks before calling. #4 (replacement for #1) took 3 intensive weeks with Petfinders (calls, emails, homevisits) and even then her adoption was a fluke thanks to that volunteer.

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Scout
Portland, Oregon
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January 1, 2011 - 8:34 pm
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Wow! How times have changed.

Sorry to hear about all the trials and tribulations, Yapette.

I've had three dogs from puppydom to croakdom over the past several decades and they all came by chance or by friends or friends of friends and they all rocked and were great (for the most part) and none of them cost me a dime except for the usual neutering and shots and stuff. Got a couple of cats that way too. I've never ventured into the sweaty, competitive world of pet acquisition by bird-dogging dogs and navigating crazed animal lover-land. I'm starting to have second thoughts on this as a valid way to get another dog.

I guess I shouldn't be too shocked as I know people who have traveled cross country to the get the dog they wanted or paid over a grand for a hot breed.

That said, the timing is right and I'll be checking out a few dogs in the rescue world in the coming weeks. I'm sort of the Zen school of doggie-getting. I figure it'll just sort of come together if I remain patient.

One good thing is through that Petfinders place you recommended, Yapette, I found a place with lots of Australian Shepards/mix of which I've had good luck with in the past. My best dog ever was a German Shepard/Australian Shepard mix.

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Yapette
Tangentistan
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January 1, 2011 - 8:57 pm
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A major difference between you & me (besides the Zen patience part...I have none) is my single rule: No Puppies. No piddling puppies. No piddling puppies who need to be potty trained.

Instead, we adopted four grown dogs (USA, 1999 to present). 3/4 of whom were adult piddlers. Adults very set in their ways who have resisted learning potty habits with all their being. For years.  

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Scout
Portland, Oregon
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January 1, 2011 - 10:48 pm
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Yikes! That must be discouraging! Half the reason to get an older dog is the assurance that they will have some self control dialed in.

So I looked at one of the those foster dog places with their application but that one is not gonna work. They want way too much personal information about me, including income, house ownership, 3 references, how many dogs I've had in the last ten years and why do I not have them now and a disclaimer that they intend to remain in contact with me if they deign to hand over a precious dog.

Nope. Not going to happen.

I'm not looking to adopt a child. I grew up on farm where animals are secondary to humans and though well treated and loved, not the center of the universe. If this is the norm, I'm just gonna start looking in the local hardware store for free dog signs. I understand people are idiots and some screening is required but that is over the top.

Speaking of incontinent dogs, my aged mother took in a 3 year old runaway that has no concept of where to go and she won't let anyone try to train it either. [Image Can Not Be Found] Is this  a refection of how out of whack our culture is becoming?

And the two dogs I liked at the Oregon Humane Society are gone now. In fact every dog I thought looked decent in the last three weeks has disappeared within a day or two. At least I have good taste. Either that or the foster people are absconding with them all.

I'm fine with a puppy if it can give me the secret paw shake. [Image Can Not Be Found]

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Toger
Somewhere, out there...
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January 2, 2011 - 4:03 pm
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Please, please, please adopt them from the ASPCA so they'll stop running full-on 60-90 second adverts showing the same sad-eyed critters backed by the music of Willy Nelson (always on my mind), Sarah MacLaughlin (I will remember you or something about angels) and someone else with a sad song that currently slips my mind... or the one where there's no sound whatsoever, just text and cringing dogs & cats.

I love dogs & cats and I would have at least two cats if I could guarantee they wouldn't escape out the back door and be eaten by raccoons or run over by a car; however, the heavy-handedness of these spots, along with the frequency (literally a couple times an hour) has made me hate them (ASPCA) with the burning hatred of a thousand suns.

If they hadn't spent the kind of money needed to run those long-ass spots as often as they do, they've had the $$ to rescue more animals.  /ventoff

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Jen
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January 3, 2011 - 12:07 pm
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Those commercials drive me nuts, too! They seem to have replaced the starving children ones with the pedophiliac spokesman, though, which is all to the good.

 

My vote is for the humane society if you're going to actively look for a dog. If you're just waiting on kismet, though, there's no point in going out of your way.

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Toger
Somewhere, out there...
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January 3, 2011 - 1:56 pm
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Jen said:

Those commercials drive me nuts, too! They seem to have replaced the starving children ones with the pedophiliac spokesman, though, which is all to the good.


YES! It's the Children's Miracle Network for Pets! [Image Can Not Be Found]

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Scout
Portland, Oregon
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January 22, 2011 - 1:15 am
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Rain, rain and more rain. I woke up one dawn a few weeks back to freezing rain and realized that getting a dog during one of the wettest Januarys ever would not be the best bonding experience. Think I'll wait till the waters recede or at least until I can see my shadow when I go outside. [Image Can Not Be Found]

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Yapette
Tangentistan
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January 22, 2011 - 12:41 pm
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My three dogs hate rain. And cold. I'll give you three seconds to think about what that means.....

Yup ---> poop 'n' pee x 3 inside the house. Puppy pads & newspapers & carrying, begging & bribing to the contrary.

In our house, inclement weather builds a negative bonding experience. [Image Can Not Be Found] [Image Can Not Be Found] [Image Can Not Be Found] [Image Can Not Be Found] [Image Can Not Be Found]

My dogs weigh less than 25 lbs in total. Your potential canine buddy will be larger....meaning larger (where is that shit icon when you need it?)...piles. In the NW Pacific I'd consider getting a dog that ignores the weather.

Oh hell, forgot you want to start with a puppy. Guaranteed poop 'n pee in the house no matter the weather. Too bad you have to wait. [Image Can Not Be Found]

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Scout
Portland, Oregon
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January 22, 2011 - 3:29 pm
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Yapette, it's not the dog I'm worried about. It's me resenting having to walk the mutt through the crappy weather. While I don't mind rain one bit, I like to enjoy it from the comfort of my cozy house. Yeah, it will have to be a bigger dog not so impacted by weather.

As far as house training a dog, I've always successfully prevailed on their sense of self-preservation in that department. I'm pretty determined about getting my way when it comes to that. If I get a rescue dog that will be a big deal. A deal breaker actually if it can't or won't learn.

We never had a dog in the house when I was a kid. Or a cat. Even in the winter, in the snow they stayed out in their own digs. We had like 5 coon hounds and a beagle or two that all lived in a shed/pen behind the house. Dog pile every night so they were fine. When I was about two the hounds were my babysitters. My parents would always look in the shed first if I was missing. I'd be about halfway down the pile. Farm life in the 50s you know. Kids wander off on their own early. Dogs live in the barn. Nobody was evil. Double rainbows every dawn. Later my mom started letting her dog inside and that, according to my dad, was when western civilization began to collapse.. 

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